Bark Camp Lake Trails

Lake Shore Trail is 3.25 miles and Kitchen Rock Trail is 0.5 mile located in the George Washington/Jefferson National Forest.

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Breaks Interstate Park

The park, located on the Virginia/Kentucky border, is one of only two Interstate Parks in the nation. The park encompasses 4,500 acres of greenwood lands and mountain scenery, including the "Grand Canyon of the South". History: The name "Breaks" is derive from the break in Pine Mountain created by the Russell Fork of the Big Sandy River as it carved a 1,000 foot gorge on its way to the Ohio River. The Russell Fork River has carved the largest canyon east of the Mississippi. Its craggy untouched beauty reaches more than five miles long and 1,600 feet deep. Park features: olympic pool, a lake with paddleboats and fishing, hiking trails, picnic areas, camping areas, a visitor center, a gift shop, playground equipment, cabins, a lodge, motel rooms, a convention center,a restaurant and amphitheater. Numerous events scheduled.

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Chief Benge Scout Trail

Chief Benge Scout Trail is a 15 mile trek that links the cool waters of High Knob Lake with 30-foot falls, rapids, and small pools on the Little Stony.  The trail follows old railroad grades at river level but makes several steep climbs up the ridges that make southwest Virginia such a rugged, wonderful place to hike.

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Counts Cabin Trail

The Counts Cabin trail, located in Dickenson County, is an 1.8 miles long trail in the Jefferson National Forest.

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Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

The first great gateway to the west, Cumberland Gap is a mountain pass that was used by wildlife, Native Indian tribes, and later by settlers moving west.  Daniel Boone was hired to blaze a trail beginning in Southwest Virginia through Cumberland Gap known as the Wilderness Road.  It became the route westward for pioneers who travelled west through the mountains into the wilderness of Kentucky.  Both the North and the South vied for control of the Cumberland Gap during the Civil war. Today the park consists of approximately 20,000 acres and 70 miles of hiking trails.  There are numberous scenic and historic features in the park and ranger led programs are offered throughout the year including tous of Gap Cave and the historic Hensley Settlement.

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Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail

A four hour driving tour through 3 counties covers the route of Daniel Boone’s famous Wilderness Trail. Boone and his axmen blazed the trail through 200 miles of Tennessee, Virginia and Kentucky Wilderness in 1775, to forge a route for settlement of the region beyond the Appalachian Mountains. After leaving Bristol, visitors may join the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail on Bloomingdale Road which leads to Anderson Blockhouse, an assembly point for thousands who used the Wilderness Trail.

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Devils Fork Trail System

Located primarily on an old logging grade. You will pass many scenic areas such as a 20' waterfall, mountain overlooks and the Devils Bathtub which is an excellent area where hikers will see the stream racing down a rock chute, swirl through the tub and race downstream.

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Fincastle Turnpike

In 1834 the Virginia General Assembly passed legislation to develop a route known as the “Fincastle Turnpike” from the Wilderness Road at Fincastle to Cumberland Gap. This was to be a toll road maintained by each county. The 248 miles of the road was completed around 1841. Militia Forts dotted the road as it traversed through the counties of Botetourt, Craig, Giles, Bland, Tazewell, Russell and the joining the Wilderness Road in Scott and Lee Counties.

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Greenbelt Trail

The Greenbelt Trail is adgacent to Bullit Park in Big Stone Gap.  The Greenbelt Trail is situated along the widened bank of the Powell River.  The perfect place for wildlife watching.

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Guest River Gorge Trail

Rails to trails project that follows an old railroad right of way paralleling the Guest River, a Virginia Scenic River. Trout fishing is permitted in the river, as well as kayacking and canoeing.  During the early 1900's when timber and coal were being hauled out of the remoste areas of Dickenson County, this passage was used as a rail line.  The history of the Gorge shows that millions of years ago the Guest River eroded a passage through Stone Mountain on its way to join the Clinch River.  Cutting through massive rock, it opened a deep rock corridor that is a scenic wonder.  Many other curiosities exist along the six mile trail, including an old railroad tunnel, bridges using the remaining railroad trestles, waterfalls and rock outcroppings.

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Heart of Appalachia Bike Route and Scenic Drive

The Heart of Appalachia Bike Route runs from Burke's Garden in Tazewell County to Guest River Gorge in Wise County. This 125 mile (with 40 miles of side trails) backroad and back country biking excursion. This route offers backroads, rails to trails, single track, historic sites, a natural preserve area, wilderness area, Amish general store, a pub, a swinging bridge, three scenic rivers, farms and coal country, and gorgeous views in Virginia's least crowded, friendliest region, the far southwestern counties of Tazewell, Bland, Russell, and Wise. This route crosses the Trans-America bike route along Route 80 in Russell Co. which travels through the "Rebdud Capital of the World", Honaker, VA.

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High Knob Trail

1.3-mile trail leads to High Knob Lake at the recreation area.

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John Flannagan Dam and Reservoir

Located in a rugged, wooded Cumberland Mountain setting, this V-shaped 1,145 acre reservoir stores waters of the Cranesnest and Pound Rivers: this is some of America's cleanest and clearest water (some spots, visibility of 40+ feet). The reservoir provide flood control, low-flow augmentation, fish and wildlife enhancement, water supply and recreation, including: picnicking, camping, swimming, fishing motor boating, water-skiing, marina, launch ramps, hiking, hunting, whitewater rafting and a visitor center.

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Lake Keokee Loop Trail

The 3.7 mile trail around the 92 acre lake can be used for hiking, fishing, and wildlife watching.  

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Laurel Fork Trail

Primitive atmosphere for camping and picnicking. Accessible by boat or foot trail only.  Beautiful scenery (small waterfalls, geological formations, a variety of vegetation) and uncrowded conditions.  Excellent base camp to explore upper reaches of Cumberland Mountain using old roads, logging trams and existing trails.  The trail is 1.5 miles long and is difficult requiring some skill and challenge to travel. 

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Legion Park Trail

This park is on the site of the old American Legion Hall. It features a picnic shelter and access to a 30 yard interpretive trail with kiosks, giving information on local history and various regional tourist attractions. The park also contains picnic tables and grills and a water fountain. The shelter at the park is available by reservations only for groups. Legion Park is designated as a offical Birding Trail site.

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Little Stony National Recreation Trail

Little Stony National Recreation Trail is located between Coeburn and Dungannon on a narrow guage railroad bed that was constructed in the early 1900's for logging. The 2.8 mile trail follows the stream through a 400 foot deep and 1,700 foot wide gorge. There are also two waterfalls 8 and 24 ft high. You can also see the large rock outcrop at the Hanging Rock Picnic Area. It is classified as being medium in degree of difficulty. Much of the trail is wide and barrier free, but there are places where the trail crosses side hollows and goes across Stony Creek where it is necessary to climb over large rocks and boulders. Fishing is also allowed along the sreams, the sheer size of the canyon and roaring sound of rushing water gives the hiker an exciting experience.

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Natural Tunnel State Park

More than 850 feet long and as high as a 10-story building, Natural Tunnel was naturally carved through a limestone ridge over thousands of years. William Jennings Bryan called it the “Eighth Wonder of the World.” Other scenic features include a wide chasm between steep stone walls surrounded by several pinnacles, or chimneys. Facilities include a campground, picnic areas, amphitheater, visitor center and gift shop, historical blockhouse, swimming pool and chair lift to the tunnel floor. The park also offers cave tours and canoe trips on the Clinch River, as well as the Cove Ridge Center, which offers environmental education, conference facilities and overnight dorm accommodations.

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North Fork of Pound Lake Reservoir

Built in 1966 as authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1960, the 154 acre lake is used for fishing, boating, camping, picnicing, hiking, and municipal water supply. Picnic area overlooks reservoir and is complete with restroom facility. The reservoir is managed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, but most of the developed recreation sites are managed by the Jefferson National Forest. Fish population in the lake includes, largemouth bass, crappie, catfish and sunfish. The lake is stocked by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.   Cane Patch campground is the center of the recreation activity on the lake. It has 33 camping sites with restrooms, showers and playground equipment.   The Laurel Fork campgrounds provide a more primitive atmosphere for campers and is only accessible by boat.

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Phillips Creek Loop Trail

A self guided trail that requires only a narrative trail brochure. There are stops on the trail, the first in a wildlife clearing for deer, turkey, and other wild game.  The trail is 1.3 miles and is easy requiring only limited skills and has slopes less than 20 percent.

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Pine Mountain Trail

Serious hikers or horseback riders will love this scenic trail which follows the crest of the Cumberland Mountains dividing Virginia and Kentucky. The trail extends 26 miles from Pound Gap to Potter's Flats in the Breaks Interstate Park. Trailhead parking for horse trailers exists. The trail requires map reading and safety skills. At least 7 access points exists off St.Rt. 630 and 611.

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Pinnacle Area Natural Preserve

The Pinnacle Natural Area Preserve is lush and offers visitors spectacular cliffs and breathtaking waterfalls. The Clinch River and Big Cedar Creek flow through this extraordinary landscape, which is known as karst topography. The rugged terrain has sinkholes, caves, sinking streams and unusual rock formations, such as The Pinnacle. The Clinch is home to various rare freshwater mussels. Big Cedar Creek is a trout fisherman's dream. The area, now managed by the state, had been managed by Russell County since 1946 as Big Cedar Creek Park. In 1978, Youth Conservation Corps volunteers developed trails and added picnic tables. Biodiversity here is abundant; no other park in Southwest Virginia has more species.

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Red Fox Trail

This historical trail is an interpretive hike back to 1892, when a massacre at the site left several people dead.

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Spearhead Trails Mountain View ATV/OHV Trail System

Spearhead Trails' Mountain View OHV system is a professionally designed multi-use trail adventure for riders of all experience levels.

A region already known for its scenic beauty, outdoor recreation, traditional American music and cultural heritage crafts, Southwest Virginia now offers family-friendly ATV trails and will soon offer equestrian systems.  Spearhead's first ATV trail system, Mountain View, is open with the trailhead in the ATV-friendly town of St. Paul. Your Spearhead Trails permit allows you to drive your ATV on designated town roads that give you access to numerous dining, lodging, retail and service locations.

Currently, there are over 80 miles of trails for ATVs, side-by-sides and motorcycles with an additional 8+ miles of single track specially designed for dirt bikes only. Trails range from beginner to intermediate to advanced - all designed for the ultimate in off-road riding adventure.

Spearhead Trails is expected to be a world-class destination with over 500 miles of ATV and Equestrian trails for every skill level by the end of 2016.  Come enjoy the scenic beauty of Southwest Virginia and a riding experience like nothing else.  The only requirements are that you must love fun, the lush outdoors and ride stopping vistas.

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Stone Mountain Trail

The first mile of the trail is a series of rock stairs that were constructed by the Youth Conservation Corps in the 1970s. Many miniature falls cascade along the sold rock streambed exposing interesting rock formations. There is a stand of old growth hemlock 300+ years old. High Butte is a large rock outcrop with views of the Powell river, Black Mountain and Kentucky. Olinger Gap is where the hiker can take a trail off to the north to Lake Keokee. One of the nicest natural settings in Southwest Virginia lies in the Roaring Branch drainage among the Hemlocks. The trail is 14.3 miles and is difficult because of its length and uneven footing.

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Sugar Hill Loop Trail

Enjoy eight miles of maintained trails along the Scenic Clinch River, the Sugar Hill Loop Trail and Oxbow Lake that start at the Oxbow Dam in St. Paul, Virginia. Dozens of tree species are identified along the trails. The Sugar Hill and Clinch River Trails have been nominated as state birding and wildlife viewing trails because of the wide variety of flora and fauna found along the way. 

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The Crooked Road

The sounds of country music beat strong and pure in Virginia, expecially in the Southwest Blue Ridge Highlands and Heart of Appalachia regions, connected by The Crooked Road - Virginia's Heritage Music Trail.  Day and night, the plaintive strains of the mountain ballads and toe-tapping, old-time dance music echo across this region's sharp ridges and deep valleys.  Look for the sign along the Trail as you explore the musical soul of Virginia's country connections and experience a unique and unforgettable experience!

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Trans-America Bike Route

This bike route follows Rt. 80 through Dickenson and Russell Counties. Route 80 can be accessed from Saltville (Smyth County) or at Elk Garden off US Hwy. 19 in Russell County.

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Virginia Coal Heritage Trail

325 miles of scenic byways stretch through seven counties and the city of Norton, providing the traveler with glimpses of unique coal mining towns that were formed more than a century ago.  This scenic byway will take you through remnants of coal camps, some still inhabited and some all but gone, past mines abandoned and some still in operation, as well as memorials and museums dedicated to the preservation of heritage, culture and proof of the tenacity of the coal miners and their families who made a living underground. 

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Wilderness Road Trail

Wilderness Road State Park is about 310 acres that lie astride the Wilderness Road driving route, a route carved by Daniel Boone in 1775.  The route, which followed a buffalo trace, opened America's first western frontier.  Most notable in the park are the Karlan Mansion built in the 1877, a state-of-the-art visitor center and Martin's Station, a replica of a colonial frontier fort that was on this site in 1775. 

Visitors can hike, bike or horseback ride on the 8.5 mile Wilderness Road Trail linked to more than 50 miles of trails in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park.

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